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Below are the 15 most recent journal entries recorded in Home of Pakistani Rock n Underground music's LiveJournal:

Thursday, August 24th, 2006
11:56 am
[desicupcake]
Hey Guyz Whts up????
Sunday, January 16th, 2005
5:33 am
[bedhoppngothboi]
New Kominas track Add us on My Space. Punk Rock! No Gimmics.
Finally, a recording done in a proper STUDIO.

This song is about how I got jumped by insane straight edge kids and was left in a heap of sweat and broken bones. Somehow I managed to drive home with a dislocated shoulder, all chipped with torn ligaments and all. I sure was missing Pakistan then, hence the title "Par Desi".

Add us on My Space:
http://www.myspace.com/thekominas

Yes, I know. You'll all say "Basim, that urdu was sung in the Female tense!".
Sorry, but I'm not particularily good at urdu. But at least I'm trying. Shush.
I've always had mostly female family friends and relatives around me to teach my urdu, hence all my tense mixups. Whoops!

Do spread the link around, yo. We actually have precussion on this one. More tabla, please.


Par desi
Of feedback I've had my fill
Within a room lodged in a wall
Somewhere in central square
where men smash 6 stringed idols

Where do I point to blame,
when men scatter like moths?
There's no time for 99 names
Midst the noise and clamour

How'd I get here,
from a land with long monsoons?
In Lahore it's raining water
In Boston it rains boots.

Chorus:
They tried to snuff me out
But they only fueled the flame
Boots crushing my shoulders
where Angels chose not too remain

Ab Siraf Yadeh
Mein Rehti mera Des

(Translation: My homeland only exists in Memory)
Tuesday, December 21st, 2004
11:48 am
[bedhoppngothboi]
2 Farsi women in Goth band COVER STORY on The Mick#9
grab it here: http://www.mickmercer.com/themick.html

It's issue #9 of The Mick

On issue #10 my own Ghost Story set in Paniput is up on page 88.


Also the two girls in the Goth band that's the cover feature of Mick #9 are Persian/Farsi

Support Desi, Middle Eastern and Muslim women in Rock music.

You can argue about academics all you want, but we have to impact culture some how. Mick Mercer is the most respected music historian when it comes to the matters of Goth, Punk, PostPunk, and all of those genres that popped up in the 80s.

MANY non-muslims read it, it would be great if more muslims did :)

~ Basim
Friday, December 10th, 2004
3:19 pm
[bedhoppngothboi]
Paki Punk in the US
http://www.muslimwakeup.com/main/archives/2004/12/masjid_taqwacor.php#more

Pow!
That's the most heavily trafficked website on islam right now. With our scratch track that's uploaded, we'll be dealing with Nation of Islam members on our back.

It's a write up on my Desi/Muslim Punk band The Kominas. The song up there was written and recorded in 4 hours. It's an attack on the New York Imam named Siraj Wahaj. He's a polygmist, former Nation of Islam member and called for the burning down of Gay Mosques. A homophobe.

We thought it would be funny to call him a fag. There you have it, that's what the songs about.

Our other stuff is more upbeat and loud, ala Sham69, Social D, Misfits.

We're auditioning drummers. You don't have to be Muslim or Desi or even Arab. But you have to be okay with being black listed by The Nation of Islam, and zealots on both sides of the Pacific Ocean.

~ Basim

Current Mood: Badmashi
Friday, November 26th, 2004
6:07 pm
[bedhoppngothboi]
Calling all Kominas, Badmashes and Haramis!
Ever been accused of forgetting your culture because of involvement you've had in Rock? I know I have.

I've seen alot of Pakistanis who begin acting like rich white people (REALLY PRUDISH) when they move to America. They loose all of that Punjabi fire.

Arai Yar, that's not what being desi is about!

To these ends, I've added this post. I front a Punk/Goth band in Boston, I'm Pakistani. I've tried to start shit with white power morons, as well as close minded Wahabs.

Together we can be powerful. Please go here and read up how you can be involved.


Tundh hai, hain nah?
(it's cool, right?)

Your fellow Punjabi Komina,
~ Basim

Current Mood: Baley Baley!
Saturday, October 23rd, 2004
5:16 am
[liquidreamz]
NIJAAT is coming back...Prepare for Salvation..
Sunday, August 8th, 2004
12:24 am
[rehmania]
Justice for all
It was no marriage, but it was on the rocks. Breaking into a new trend of split bandmates going solo, Jal were through before they had even geared in. Maybe 2 were just not company or maybe 4 made for one crowd too many. No misprint; 15-year-old Omer Nadeem and 16-year-old Haider Halim were 2 young guitarists in the wrong place at the right time, bringing up the hidden rear end of a wildfire quartet that disguised itself as a pair. In its embryonic stage, Goher’s idea to start up a band could not have forewarned him against the turbulent times ahead. For teenagers like his guitar student Haider and Haider’s equally enthusiastic neighbour, bass guitarist Omer, a premonition was out of question. Tragically, the experience was a bittersweet trail led by the zeal of 2 exploited kids doing what they enjoyed most- playing music.


From lending musical skills to instruments and conveyance to and from performances, Omer and Haider were motivated youngsters. More importantly, the first concerts started rolling in through them as their contacts promoted Aadat to take the Pakistani scene by storm. For a one-time contract with Mobilink, the foursome hoisted Shahbaz, Atif’s older brother, onto their rapidly enlarging platform by consensus to manage them. True to his Pakistani roots, he personally and permanently confirmed his position to handle all the popular band’s affairs when the going had gotten good. Obviously the generation gap was still to be bridged because the older 2, particularly Atif later coupled with Shahbaz, continuously failed to accept the younger band members as anything more than sessionists-concert players to be paid little or not at all. The first authentic manifestation? A concert at UET with a payment of 23,000 rupees out of which only 500 were doled out to each of the kids. Interestingly, the manager, contrary to his line of profession, also regularly abused the webmaster who voluntarily managed the band’s website.

Together in connivance, Atif and Shahbaz disputed not only with Goher, but especially with Omer and Haider, whom Shahabaz constantly labelled as ‘kids’ who had to be done away with. Charging the exuberant 80,000 rupees per concert that he did, it was no surprise more concerts that had come through Omer and Haider were missed than performed at. At instances, the budding pair was naively unaware of and faintly indifferent to the monopoly the manager was gradually building up for his brother. An undeclared 45,000 rupees were pocketed by the brothers at The Planet’s opening and another 50,000 at a concert at al-Hamra, about which payment Omer and Haider had been told would stand at only 2/5th the actual amount. From that concert’s rake-in, Omer was promised a bass guitar, which he never received. Strangely, or not so much anymore, Aadat’s video featuring the band’s neo-financer Umar Ahmed and Shahbaz on drums completely excluded the two young neighbours, who were clueless about the shoot. When questioned about their absence, they covered up the scheme by highlighting the inappropriate time of the filming, 2 weeks prior to their exams. Even the video’s photoshoot was posted on the internet before they became aware of what had happened. Knocking at Truth’s door much later came as a shock for both of them; this did not, however, distance them enough from the likes of the self-elected band manager and his coterie of pro-Atif cohorts to prevent the subsequent misfortunes.

The final strain on Atif and Goher’s pseudomatrimony was Atif’s refusal to fly to Karachi to perform for a hyped and eager ARY. When the cat is away, the mouse will play and play Atif did- with others’ minds. Staying back in Lahore, he obdurately insisted he was the proper owner of Jal and wooed Omer and Haider through innocent-faced deception, promising them payments and exposure for siding with him against Goher. Inexperience took centre stage and soon the two found themselves unknowingly stepping into the lion’s den. Atif stuck out an open palm for the band’s previous compositions and the two obliged. Having played solid roles in conceiving the songs, both thought it understandable to bring the numbers over to the other side-apparently, their new side. The band was officially over.

With Shahbaz marketing his sibling like a political candidate, it was the trunk for Omer and Haider. Concert intros were ‘Atif with Jal the Band’ and only Atif was heard on FM stations, read about in print or seen on TV. To their vocalist’s face, the tag-along teens were band members, but to others they were only to be concert guitarists. At one point, their guitars were borrowed and performed with, while the instruments’ owners discovered much later through word of mouth or media as to how their strings had spent their weekend nights. Among their biggest performances were Karachi’s ‘Ab To Aadat See Hai’ and another up in the capital city, in both of which only Haider’s tickets were covered, a shocked Omer having been considered too unprofessional for the job. But even a payment of 63,000 rupees could not persuade the older men to share more than a mere 1500 rupees with Haider. Shortly before the parting of ways that ensued, Omer and Haider demanded an official band photoshoot with Atif, which he waved off as costly and time-consuming.

The plot of the wild misadventure peaked to its climax when Jal Pari’s release started to be anxiously anticipated. The intention to solo had not been there or maybe it was just skilfully concealed. Nevertheless, it was one more goodie in Atif’s bag of unpleasant surprises. Exchanging roles, Mehmood Rehman, previously a sessionist drummer, featured on the album with the guitars taught to him by Omer and Haider as had been composed with Goher previously (excluding Tehzeeb and Mahi Ve), while the latter three were pushed out the back door and denied credit altogether. The sole acknowledgement of Omer and Haider was a small picture of them included in the album sleeve, titled ‘Concert Players’. Because of a rare bold step from the then frustrated kids after Atif had gifted unreleased copies of the album to numerous others, he gave his word to let them hear the record once before its official market launch. This amounted to yet another wasted promise. Not long after, the exasperated boys gave up on Atif to work independently on their joint project and session for Roxen.

As the news leaked onto forums, it was received by mixed reactions of disappointment, frustration and even blatant mockery. While some sided with the adolescent pair, others believed no ill factors could possibly have influenced their decision to sever ties with their only remnants of what they had dedicatedly engendered. In fact, the matter stretched enough to prompt a response from the man-of-the-hour himself. A defensive move, it attempted to block what light it could of the real story from the eyes of the public. On the 1st of August 2004, a post on Atif’s official site clearly set out his accusations of Omer and Haider’s disrespect for him and the latter’s Punjabi verbal abuse. It further intended to strip the two of any credibility, going so far as to assert that they were never involved in the compositions, but only played as were instructed. http://h3o.info/forum/index.php?showtopic=1263&st=75)

In chemical jargon, this would be a state function. Irrespective of the path followed, there is still one change. Jal is now split 3-way and although an optimist might see 3 potential bodies of talent in the scene, exploitation and trickery are the outcome. Music does not sell to every Pakistani class, but it is definitely gradually emerging as a ‘profession’ (parents, take a groan). Musicians in the field must attain and then maintain a certain calibre. This should exclude, without having to say, privilege and artiste abuse. Similarly, trading in a fellow’s compositions is not a trait age can defy. One can only be amazed and ask, ‘What next?’

Current Mood: artistic
Thursday, August 5th, 2004
12:51 am
[rehmania]


gohar performing live ........






anf farhan the new vocalist



and this is atif ........
album review already written in the last entry

Current Mood: lonely
Saturday, July 31st, 2004
11:22 pm
[rehmania]
Atif aslam's JAL PARI...........album review
A first-time sponge. One waits for the magic of the egg whites and baking soda, but the cake falls flat on its face. That's Jal Pari and not even fairy magic can save this album.

For a debut solo release, it's wondrous how such a flat piece of work is selling like warm sticky buns on a chilly London morning. Courtesy of Mekaal Hasan, Aadat still remains the most polished number. Questionable, though is whether 3 versions of it on the same release do not seek to overplay the remaining weaker tracks. Aankhoun Say has been better performed as Dil Harey by Gohar, but the album version featuring Atif doesn't manage to unite the vocals and music to a focus. This is not uncommon in the other numbers either, like Yaqeen. Ehsaas gets one tapping foot to 'Who Could it be Knockin' at my Door?' A clash between Western 80s' pace and lead notes and refined, subcontinental, yet misplaced here, voice, the two fight to smother each other. The music is more stubborn and in this track, wins- a surprise considering the album is dominated by Atif's singing and backed by extremely simplistic, impassive music-even for a popular genre. Another awkward piece is Tehzeeb, a lonely blast from the past, a darker number that appears in no particular order of effect in the track listing. The vocals excel again, but then hardly any young man sings such sorrowful ghazal-inspired songs these days.

Bheegi Yaadein is the other re-recording and when starts off, seems better than a previous unplugged version. However, it not only plays to a ditto beat of Zindagi, but is based on similar strum and vocal patterns. Zindagi itself cautiously edges to a pop-rock boundary, but falls short of crossing. For a public pleaser, though, its tempo is right and the easy going riff is a good indicator of what Atif's guitarists are competent of when in the right state of mind.

The only sign of versatility is the title track with its exotic touch of classical guitar, diffused flutes and congos. Definitely worth 3 claps, yet one wonders if shorter aalaps would not have better complemented the music. Saving Atif unnecessary negative critique are Mahi Ve and Gal Sun Ja, not because they are exemplary musical or lyrical treats, but because Punjabi is sweet in any situation.

Generally, the affair is no surprise; haste makes waste and Atif couldn't have proven it in better fashion. The words might be excused considering pop is a genre meant to be taken with a bit of fluff, but throughout is a dearth of an essential ingredient for successful music-soul. Contrary to the 'sensitive music' mentioned on the sleeve, the album is an unfeeling length of pompous vocals on different paths from the most basic of melodic theory/expression. If Atif intends to back his vocals with solid praise and maturity, he ought to give equal attention to all aspects of his album the next solo time around.

If this were somebody's birthday cake, it would put the O in ordinary. 11 sponges baked on 1 decent egg white won't make you the Pillsbury man.

Current Mood: crazy
Monday, July 19th, 2004
3:26 pm
[liquidreamz]
Faraz Anwar
Allan Holdsworth:
Faraz Anwar is the King Of Guitar's In Pakistan an awesome guitar player with amazing guitar playing skills hard to find.
Mekaal Hassan:
Faraz is a great player and a very talented musician. He is without doubt, an immensely skilled and emotive player and is my favorite guitarist in Pakistan.
 
Waqas Ahmed (Kain):
Faraz is a great musician , and an awesome guitarist. one of my inspirations for sure.
Shahzaib Atif (FM 89):
Faraz was the first best thing that ever happened to me from Pakistani pop music, COLLAGE , Fakhr e Alam, Mizraab n even DUSK... he's always been Numero Uno. no match for him and he's got this attitude playing which makes him the Gawd of Pakistani guitar playing.
Omar Pervaiz (Naqsh):
Faraz has been an inspiration for me for a long time and he still is ! Achieving the excellence that he has while remaining in the country and being self taught is astounding ! Above all is his down to earth and accessible personality. This is the type of guy that truly moves you ..not some guy with a course from a fancy music uni. and an attitude from hell ! ROCK ON FARAZ !
Hassan Khan (H2O):
Faraz is a living legend ..hezz a great inspiration for all young artists like us..& hezz the best around

Haider Azim (ARJ):
Best Potential Guitarist around Rite now in the music industry.

 

Fawad Shah (NIJAAT):

Faraz Anwar is GOD ov Pakistani Music industry

2:44 pm
[liquidreamz]
Words....

'It’s not an R.D Burman song.'
- Ali Zafar on being asked how he would feel if R.D. Burman was around today and asked for royalties for the song Channo.

 

Yeah Right O_o

 

'Hum kya mer gaye hain?'
- Fawad A Khan's question to a girl who couldn't seem to control her undying love for Ali Noor.

 

'People in Pakistan wouldn't recognize sarcasm if it danced naked in front of their headlights...'
- Moby (of Corduroy)

'Let's put the 'FUN' back in fundamentalism'
- Salman Ahmed on the Bill Maher's Politically Incorrect.
vs
'Let's put the SOCK back in Salman's mouth'
- Rohail Khan on watching Salman Ahmed on Bill Maher's Politically Incorrect.

'And how can I spread Islam by singing Sanwli Salooni?'
- Junaid Jamshed in an interview with Glimmer Magazine.


'The day we play it safe, we will be dead as musicians. Experimentation is the need of the day.'
- Bilal Maqsood, of Strings, trying to defend the very formulaic Dhaani.

'Mein Convent say parhee huee hoon'
- Film Actress Reema in the GEO TV program 'Aik Din Geo Kay Saath.

'Channo... bhaag ja!'
- Tanseer Dar (of Karavan) performing a rock version of Channo at a concert.

'Are they progressing? Are you sure? Is having more channels progression of music quality?'
- Aamir Zaki on being asked if the Pakistani music scene was progressing

Sunday, July 18th, 2004
11:29 pm
[liquidreamz]
MIZRAAB r0cks

 

Metal has arrived! Whether Pakistan is ready for it or not, it does not matter. Because metal has certainly arrived! There had been bands that claimed that rock/metal cannot be accompanied by Urdu lyrics. But that statement has been falsified. Mizraab has finally done it. Their music is raw, pure, aggressive and hard-hitting. The lyrics are thought provoking and mourning over the senselessness and insensibilities of the society. This time around it has not been toned down to meet the frequency of certain ears. It has not been changed to make it user-friendly or fake it according to the "demand-of-the-masses". It is the expression as it came from the heart - no changes, no compromises and no selling-out.

read more..Collapse )

Monday, July 19th, 2004
12:48 am
[rehmania]
JAL........the band
.......a new dam great band in the pop industry ...although the vocalists of the band had a fight between them and jal got broke up ....but now when gohar the real guy who made the band didnt lose hope , made a new vocalist named farhan ..........so now gohar and farhan are the new vocalists of the band ...........there'a a song lamhey....whihc is real dam great ........u can find the song in www.umrevolution.com.........in his site u could all the latest updated paki songs .....even vidoes .........writing the lyrics of the song wo lamhey .............


wo lamhey ....wo ratay ...... koi na janay thi kaysee batay .....wooooo barsatay .....wo bheege bheeege yaday ....wooo bheeege bheege yadayyyy..........na may janoo....na tu janay ...kaysa hay ye alam ........koi na janayyyyyyyyyy....phir kiyu hay ye tanhai ....kaysee hay ye roswaye.......ghum hu gaye kiyuuuuuuuu...........khuuuuuu gaye hummmmmmmm .........sagar kii in leyroo say ghara hay mera dil....sehraoo kiiii in huwaooo may kaysay aaye gee bahaarrr....phir kiyu hay ye tanhai ...kaysee hay ye rowaye...ghum hu gaye kiyuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu...khuuuu gaye hummmmmmmmmmmmmmm.......wo lamhey ..woo ratay ....koi na janay thi kaysee batay ....wooo barsatayyyyyyyy......wo bheegee bheegee yaday ...wooo bheegee yadayyyyyyyyy..............................andhi hu ya tufah hu ...meray man may rhay tuuu sada...koi apna hu ya paraya huu ...usay dhundhoo may kaha...phir koi hay yee tanhaiii ...kaysee hay yee rosawaye....ghum hu gaye kiyuuu.....khu gaye humm.....ophhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh wo lamhay ...wp ratay ...koi na janay ...thi kaysee batayy...wooooo barsatay .......wooo bheeegee bheggee yaday ...wooo bheege bheege yaday ...... .......... u know........... when ya listen to this........u are also gonna be a big big fannnnnn of JAL

Current Mood: creative
Friday, July 9th, 2004
3:38 am
[liquidreamz]
BASS

Ten Biggest Bass Grooves in Pakistan

By Irum Bukhari

 When I was first asked by my friend to write an article about ten biggest bass grooves in Pakistan, I was in a fix for quite a while thinking that the article may just contain samples from only two of the regular bassists in Pakistan; Brian O'Connell and Sameer Ahmed. Then sanity dawned encouraging me to look out for the samples played by other fellows as well who either do not fit in the league of regular bassists or somehow just did not convince me into considering their samples in the first go. The point here is not that I am trying to undermine their talent, but it’s just that they don’t occur to me as quick as these two big names in the bass showground.

Read more...Collapse )



Current Mood: tired
Thursday, July 8th, 2004
4:50 am
[liquidreamz]

Gum hoon main soochon main apni kaheeen

Tanha hon rahoon main apni kaheen....

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